16 seriously cool things to do in Canada’s cities

  • Canada is rightly known for its incredible landscapes and wildlife – but its cities are just as epic 
  • Vancouver, Toronto, Ottawa, Quebec City and Montreal are all packed with brilliant attractions 
  • Visitors can contemplate the infinite at a planetarium, play frisbee golf and skate along a frozen canal  

Canada is rightly known for its incredible landscapes and wildlife – but its cities are just as epic and packed with brilliant attractions. 

Visitors can walk around the edge of the CN Tower’s observation deck hundreds of feet up in Toronto, do yoga in front of the Hogwarts-style Parliament building in Ottawa and stay in a hotel made of ice in Quebec City.

And there are plenty more amazing urban adventures on offer besides these. Here MailOnline Travel reveals 16 seriously cool things to do in Canada’s cities.

Tread the edge of the CN Tower in Toronto



The view from the top of Toronto’s CN Tower (right) is thrilling, but now you can make the experience up there even more memorable by walking around the edge of the observation deck (left)

As if zooming in a glass-bottom elevator to an observation deck 1,136ft up Toronto’s startlingly impressive CN Tower wasn’t exciting enough – now you can have an extra adrenalin rush by walking hands-free around the outside of the structure while you’re there.

But don’t worry, you’re clipped in to a harness as you make your way around the outer edge.

It means that during the walk you can lean right back over the city 116 storeys beneath you.

Afterwards, you may need a drink, so pop along to the tower’s wine cellar. It’s the world’s highest and has a stock of 550 different wines from which you can toast your high-flying adventure with.

Click here for more information. 

Visit the Ice Hockey Hall of Fame – then get your skates on and watch a game


The Hockey Hall of Fame (pictured) in Toronto covers 60,000 feet and contains the world’s largest collection of hockey memorabilia

Canadians have an unflinching passion for ice hockey and the Hockey Hall of Fame in downtown Toronto is a veritable temple to the sport.

Inside its hallowed halls – covering 60,000sq ft – you can explore the world’s largest collection of hockey memorabilia, go one-on-one with animated versions of some of hockey’s greatest players and gaze upon the revered Stanley Cup.

It would only be right and proper to follow this visit up by watching a real game.

Ice hockey is incredibly exciting and Canada is home to some of the best teams on the planet, including the Toronto Maple Leafs, who play at the Air Canada Centre

Stroll the Seawall in Vancouver and gaze at totem poles



Vancouver’s Seawall (left) is extremely popular with runners and cyclists – and it’s not hard to see why. The path takes visitors right past stunning totem poles (right)

Exercise, a gorgeous view and fascinating indigenous culture can all be put on the agenda at Vancouver’s 13.5-mile Seawall.

It runs round the outside of Stanley Park next to the stunning English Bay and is a wonderful place to walk or cycle.

The path is bordered by a lush temperate rainforest and takes visitors past magnificent totem poles, built by First Nations peoples. 

For more information click here

Marvel at Vancouver’s skyline from Highview Lookout – and from the skies from a sea plane


Highview Lookout affords visitors a breathtaking view of Vancouver – but it’s possible to rise even higher above the city, thanks to tours by Harbour Air Seaplanes

For a truly spectacular view of Vancouver from above visit Highview Lookout on the edge of Cypress Provincial Park in West Vancouver.

From this point it’s possible to see the whole of the city and beyond.

An even more breath-taking panorama is possible, though, thanks to Harbour Air Seaplanes.

It offers amazing flightseeing tours over the city and surrounding mountains and ‘fly ‘n’ dine’ tours, which includes a flight to Horseshoe Bay, a three-course meal and a limo ride back into town.

For more information click here.

Ice skate through Ottawa on a frozen canal


Skaters have nearly five miles of groomed ice to glide around on in the downtown area of Ottawa in the winter months

In the winter months the Rideau Canal in Ottawa becomes something quite beautifully unique – the world’s largest naturally frozen skating rink.

Skaters have nearly five miles of groomed ice to glide around on in the downtown area of the city and there are food stalls along the way selling hot chocolate and tasty fried dough called beavertails – a local speciality – to keep them toasty.

One of the best times to skate the canal is during the buzz of the annual Ottawa–Gatineau Winterlude festival, created to celebrate Canada’s unique northern climate and culture.

It takes place each February, with activities and attractions that include ice sculpture competitions and a huge snow playground containing snow statues, giant slides and a mammoth zip line.

And when the ice melts the good times continue.

The canal, for instance, can then be explored by canoe or on a boat cruise and the banks roamed by foot or on bicycles.

The canal, which measures 125 miles and connects Kingston with Ottawa, was named a Unesco national historic site in 2007.

For more information click here

Go to a mass yoga class on Parliament Hill, Ottawa


Mat’s amazing: Every Wednesday at noon during the summer, hundreds of people flock to Ottawa’s Parliament Hill

A visit to Ottawa’s Parliament Hill and the government buildings there, with their Gothic gargoyles, archways and turrets, is like stepping into the world of Hogwarts – and that makes the yoga sessions that take place in front of them all the more spellbinding.

Every Wednesday at noon during the summer, hundreds of people flock to the hill with mats and stretch out in front of the amazing 151-year-old structure.

Once the session is over a free guided tour of the building is highly recommended. At night, meanwhile, visitors can enjoy a free sound-and-light show, which projects a beautiful story onto the Parliament buildings themselves.

For more information click here.

Party at the Montreal Jazz Festival


The Montreal Jazz Festival (pictured) sees 3,000 artists from 30 countries gather over 11 days to perform around 1,000 concerts, many of them free. It’s one of the world’s greatest cultural experiences

It has to be seen – and heard – to be believed.

The Montreal Jazz Festival sees 3,000 artists from 30 countries gather over 11 days to perform around 1,000 concerts, many of them free – to two million festival-goers.

That’s quite some party. There’s pedigree, too, with past performers including Prince, Herbie Hancock and BB King.

And it all takes place in the most beguiling of cities, one that’s brimming with chic cafes, refined restaurants and beautiful boutique hotels. 

See the spooky side of Canada’s cities 


There are fascinating ghost tours in Ottawa, Toronto and Kingston. Pictured is Fairmont Chateau Laurier in Ottawa where, as the guides explain, people have reported seeing objects move randomly across rooms

The guides who run the Haunted Walks of Ottawa, Toronto and Kingston promise that you’ll never look at these cities in the same way again once they’ve pointed out the spooky credentials that some of their buildings have.

In Ottawa they guide brave souls around the Bytown Museum, Fairmont Chateau Laurier  – where people have reported seeing objects randomly move across rooms – and the haunted high school.

In Toronto tours are led around the Distillery, reputedly the city’s most haunted spot, spooky theatres and some of the city’s oldest buildings.

Kingston’s Haunted Walks guides, meanwhile, show visitors the city’s haunted hotels, hidden burial grounds and allegedly possessed courtyard.

Those who sign up hear anecdotes from the city’s darker past and some intriguing history. 

For more information click here (if you dare). 

Cool off in the Ice Hotel in Quebec City


An astounding 15,000 tonnes of snow and 500,000 tonnes of ice is used to build Quebec City’s Hotel de Glace

Welcome to North America’s only ice hotel.

Every year between January and March in downtown Quebec City the Hotel de Glace throws open its frosty doors.

The hotel and its 44 rooms and suites are built from an astounding 15,000 tonnes of snow and 500,000 tonnes of ice.

The lobby features statues and chandeliers made from ice and guests, after spending time in the outdoor spas and sauna, then sleep in rooms with ice walls, ice ceilings and even ice beds.

Guests may have to layer up, but this is a winter wonderland that’ll truly warm the heart.

For more information click here

Lunch at Toronto’s St Lawrence Market


St Lawrence Market has been running in some form since 1803 and has evolved into an essential destination for foodies. It’s brimming with artisanal produce and top eateries

St Lawrence Market, in Toronto’s historic Old Town, is one of the city’s most mouth-watering attractions.

The market has been running in some form since 1803 and has evolved into an essential destination for foodies.

Visitors can buy top-quality artisanal produce from a huge number of stalls and choose from a number of excellent restaurants – Canadian, French, Italian and Spanish – for a bite to eat.

For more information click here.

Catch a flick at the Toronto International Film Festival


Hollywood comes to town for the Toronto International Film Festival (Tiff). Actor Benedict Cumberbatch is pictured here signing autographs at the event

Every September Hollywood’s A-listers arrive in Toronto for the International Film Festival (Tiff) – a world-class, hugely influential celebration of cinema.

The festival, which began in 1976, has been used to premiere a multitude of big-hitters, including American Beauty, 127 Hours, Black Swan and Ray.

Hundreds of movies are screened in various venues for the 11-day event, including the stunning Bell Lightbox Cinema, which is a popular year-round attraction for film fans.

For more information click here.

See a gig at Vancouver’s Commodore Ballroom


Vancouver’s Commodore Ballroom is venerated by music fans. It’s hosted the likes of Nirvana, Dire Straits and Kiss – and has a bouncy dance floor

Nirvana, Dire Straits and Kiss have all played there, it’s been named as one of North America’s most influential clubs and there’s even a book that charts its impact on the rock scene.

For music fans, a visit to Vancouver’s venerated Commodore Ballroom is a must.

The 1,000-capacity venue showcases a superb mix of up-and-coming acts and big names – and there’s a sprung dance floor for guests to bounce the night away on.

For more information click here.

Contemplate the infinite at Montreal’s Rio Tinto Planetarium


Montreal’s planetarium (pictured) features giant 360-degree screens and bean bag chairs, so the infinite can be contemplated in maximum comfort

The Rio Tinto Planetarium in Montreal boasts two theatres, which both offer heavenly experiences for visitors.

One runs fascinating educational shows about astronomy and the other projects spectacular space-themed visuals onto a giant 360-degree screen.

And there are bean bag chairs, too, so visitors can contemplate the infinite in complete comfort.

For more information click here

Throw yourself into a game of Frisbee Golf at an 18-hole course on the Toronto Islands


The Toronto Islands (pictured) are just minutes away from the city by ferry – and it’s possible to play frisbee golf on one of the biggest isles, Ward’s

There are two dozen isles that make up the Toronto Islands, which are just minutes from the city by ferry, and travelling there is like stepping into another world.

There are incredible beaches, 1920s summer cottages and beautiful English gardens to explore

What’s more, on one of the larger islands – Ward’s – there’s a superb 18-hole frisbee golf course. The aim of the game is to try and land discs in basket-like targets, in as few throws as possible.

It’s great fun and doesn’t cost a penny, either.

For more information click here.

Have a fantastically fascinating time at the Royal BC Museum, Victoria


The Royal BC Museum (pictured) tells the natural and human history of British Columbia through immersive exhibits and intriguing artefacts – there are a staggering seven million on display

The Royal BC Museum will fascinate and entertain in equal measure.

Here the natural and human history of British Columbia is told through immersive exhibits and intriguing artefacts – there are a staggering seven million on display.

Highlights include a First Peoples mask gallery, a woolly mammoth set in its habitat and an incredible replica colonial street.

There’s also an Imax cinema that screens Hollywood blockbusters and documentaries.

For more information click here.

Take thrills to another level on gigantic zip lines



The Treetop Trekking company has aerial games courses in five parks in Ontario and five in Quebec, which include some amazing zip-line rides (pictured)

Fun is really branching out in Canada, with amazing zip lines.

The Treetop Trekking company for instance has stunning aerial games courses in its parks that give visitors the opportunity to zip-line through treetops and across lakes on lines up to 1,000 feet long.

The superb canopy courses also include balance logs, wooden bridges, cable traverses and Tarzan swings.

There are five parks in Ontario, two just 25 minutes from Toronto, and five in Quebec – under the brand name Arbraska.

In Montreal, meanwhile, there’s a thrilling double zip line that enables visitors to fly right over the Bonsecours island in the old port area.

Visit treetoptrekking.com/en/ for more information and MTL Zipline.






Courtesy: Daily Mail Online

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Name *
Email *
Website