Artist Gregory Skolozdra captures incredible bolt of lightning flashing across the sky

  • Gregory Skolozdra captured incredible lightning bolt from Queens
  • He climbed onto the roof of his artist’s studio when storm broke out
  • Temperatures reached high into the 70s, but torrential rain, thunder and lightning, and even hailstones eventually broke out on Sunday night 

One artist climbed onto the roof of his studio in Queens, New York, just in time to catch an incredible bolt of lighting flash across the sky in a purple haze.

Gregory Skolozdra was working in his Long Island City studio when he rushed to the roof of the building to catch the storm at around 6pm.

It was uncharacteristically warm on Sunday, but foreboding clouds suddenly took over the sky with thunder and lightning breaking out before New Yorkers were pelted with hailstones. 


Gregory Skolozdra was working in his Long Island City studio when he rushed to the roof of the building to catch the storm at around 6pm



The artist managed to catch a lightning bolt as it descending from the sky before it was gone in a flash

In the video shot by Skolozdra, the camera pans over the night sky when a burst of light suddenly appears.

The bolt of lightning descended from a cloud of purple haze, setting the sky alight before it disappeared as quickly as it came. 

A crack of thunder could be heard less than five seconds later, with some reports of car alarms being set off throughout the city during the storm.  

New Yorkers took to social media and joked about the apocalypse when hailstones measuring up to .75 inches across landed in the metropolitan area.

HOW LIGHTNING BOLTS FORM IN THUNDERSTORMS

Most people are familiar with lightning that comes from thunderstorms which form from cumulonimbus clouds.

The Earth experiences around 30 to 50 lightning strikes every second and there are an estimated three million flashes every day.

Friction between ice particles in the cloud causes a build-up of electrostatic charge.

Most discharges travel from the cloud to the ground, following channels of ionized air.

Some scientists believe these channels are created by the collision of high energy cosmic rays or neutrinos from deep space with the Earth’s atmosphere.

Traditional lightning bolts can also travel from cloud to cloud, creating a variety of different types, such as sheet lightning.

 







Courtesy: Daily Mail Online

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Name *
Email *
Website