Photos show Maasai elder riding a MOUNTAIN BIKE over the African plains as first-ever cycling safari launches in the shadow of Kilimanjaro

  • A Maasai elder was pictured riding a mountain bike for the first time to his village 
  • The man, known as Isaac, took to a mountain bike to mark the launch of a new cycle tour
  • The route, launched by Intrepid Travel, is the first-ever to go through Arusha National Park

The Maasai people of East Africa are more regularly seen wandering the dusty safari plains on foot in colourful dress.

But these stunning shots show a Maasai elder riding a mountain bike for the first time, with the the shiny spokes and steel frame striking a sharp contrast to his traditional guise.

The village elder, known as Isaac, took to a mountain bike to mark the launch of a new cycle tour. 

These stunning shots show a Maasai elder riding a mountain bike for the first time, with the the shiny spokes and snazzy steel frame striking a sharp contrast to his traditional guise

These stunning shots show a Maasai elder riding a mountain bike for the first time, with the the shiny spokes and snazzy steel frame striking a sharp contrast to his traditional guise

Captured close to the small village of Mtu Wa Mbo in Tanzania, the images show the Masaai man pedalling over the sandy, scorched ground, with his Superman-coloured red and blue clothing billowing behind him

Captured close to the small village of Mtu Wa Mbo in Tanzania, the images show the Masaai man pedalling over the sandy, scorched ground, with his Superman-coloured red and blue clothing billowing behind him

Captured close to the small village of Mtu Wa Mbo in Tanzania, the images show the Masaai man pedalling over the sandy, scorched ground, with his Superman-coloured red and blue clothing billowing behind him.

The new bicycle route, launched by Intrepid Travel, is the first-ever to go through Arusha National Park – the site of Kilimanjaro’s little sister, Mount Meru (4566m).

Isaac led the first group of cyclists to venture on the trek to his village, which is located more than 160km outside of the National Park.

As he neared the community, children gathered around to catch a glimpse of Isaac’s new ride. 

New ride: The village elder, known as Isaac, took to a mountain bike to mark the launch of a new cycle tour

Not far to go! Isaac stops to show cyclists where his remote village is located

New ride: The village elder, known as Isaac, took to a mountain bike to mark the launch of a new cycle tour

Early learner: Photos show one Maasai child, confidently taking to the saddle with one of the cyclists keeping an eye on him

Early learner: Photos show one Maasai child, confidently taking to the saddle with one of the cyclists keeping an eye on him

Photos show one Maasai child, confidently taking to the saddle with one of the cyclists keeping a close eye on him. 

Mountain biking is becoming increasingly popular in Africa.

Many say it offers a more intimate view of the wildlife and scenery as opposed to touring around in a Jeep.

Despite this, many national parks do not permit cyclists due to dangerous animals. But for those keen on Arusha, there are no lions roaming around the lushly forested park.

This week Lonely Planet released a new guide, Epic Bike Rides Of The World, with one of its toughest routes being the ‘Tour d’Afrique’.

The 7,500-mile route – which starts in Cairo, Egypt – takes bikers through a range of landscapes, zipping through Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, Botswana and Namibia.   

 Pedal this way! Isaac led the first group of cyclists to venture on the Arusha National Park route to his village, which is located more than 160km outside of the National Park

 Pedal this way! Isaac led the first group of cyclists to venture on the Arusha National Park route to his village, which is located more than 160km outside of the National Park

Mountain biking is becoming increasingly popular in Africa - many say it offers a more intimate view of the wildlife and scenery as opposed to touring around in a Jeep

Mountain biking is becoming increasingly popular in Africa – many say it offers a more intimate view of the wildlife and scenery as opposed to touring around in a Jeep

Despite this, many national parks do not permit cyclists due to dangerous animals - but for those keen on Arusha, there are no lions in the lushly forested park (above, bikers at Lake Manyara National Park)

Despite this, many national parks do not permit cyclists due to dangerous animals – but for those keen on Arusha, there are no lions in the lushly forested park (above, bikers at Lake Manyara National Park)







Courtesy: Daily Mail Online

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