Death Valley images show when it does rain there is enough water to KAYAK on

  • Death Valley is one of the driest and hottest places on earth but its deserts can be flooded after rare storms 
  • Hiker Steve Hall goes to the national park three to five times a year so visited in time for one of the floods 
  • After walking over rough terrain for 30 minutes, he paddled across the water, which was just deep enough

Death Valley in California might have a reputation for being one of the driest and hottest places on Earth but occasionally parts of it flood and you can actually go kayaking there.

Proving that it is possible, adventure hiker Steve Hall headed to the national park with his camera to capture the desert’s breath-taking transformation. 

The 41-year-old took a yellow inflatable kayak on to a small lake that had formed temporarily and paddled his way along the surface.

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Steve Hall hikes in Death Valley three to five times per year so he was prepared to make the most of the rare flooding at the national park

Steve Hall hikes in Death Valley three to five times per year so he was prepared to make the most of the rare flooding at the national park

Death Valley is one of the driest places on earth with a reputation of being one of the hottest as well. However, flooding can occur

Death Valley is one of the driest places on earth with a reputation of being one of the hottest as well. However, flooding can occur

Steve Hall (pictured) took two yellow kayaks and an inflatable shark to Death Valley in California when a rare lake formed in its deserts

Steve Hall (pictured) took two yellow kayaks and an inflatable shark to Death Valley in California when a rare lake formed in its deserts

The desert landscape of Death Valley was once the setting for Lake Manly, a body of water that existed around 20,000 years ago.

Occasionally, flooding still happens in Death Valley after storms, which means that the lake returns temporarily.

Just in March this year, MailOnline Travel reported that the desert became covered in flowers following rare storms. 

The photographs featured here are from a trip that Steve Hall took in 2010. 

He told MailOnline Travel: ‘Because I take between three to five trips per year to Death Valley National Park, I am aware that Lake Manly appears every five years or so.

‘Thus, I was waiting for the next appearance of the lake so that I could go kayaking.’

In fact, Hall has probably seen more of the national park than many other people and he documents his travel adventures on his website panamintcity.com.

There's not much water and it was just about deep enough for the inflatable kayaks to float on top of the incredibly flat flooded surface

There’s not much water and it was just about deep enough for the inflatable kayaks to float on top of the incredibly flat flooded surface

According to Hall, who is an experienced hiker, it takes about 30 minutes of hiking over rough terrain to reach the edge of the lake

According to Hall, who is an experienced hiker, it takes about 30 minutes of hiking over rough terrain to reach the edge of the lake

The desert landscape of Death Valley was once the setting for Lake Manly, a body of water that existed around 20,000 years ago 

The desert landscape of Death Valley was once the setting for Lake Manly, a body of water that existed around 20,000 years ago 

Death Valley as it normally looks is dusty and barren

A map shows the desert is in California

Death Valley as it normally looks is dusty and barren (left). A map shows the desert is in California (right)

As a result of his knowledge of the area, he was able to set up filming locations for the music video of Who Feels Love by Oasis. 

For other tourists, the sight is a little more unusual.

Hall recalled: ‘The lady who stopped and photographed us was in complete shock that we were loading kayaks onto our vehicle.

‘She literally asked us if we were lost and expressed concern that we had ended up in the wrong national park.’ 

Getting to the site for kayaking isn’t easy though.

Hall, who is an experienced hiker, says that to reach the lake shore, you have to walk over ‘rough terrain for about 30 minutes.’

However, it was well worth the journey and the wait.

The avid hiker said: ‘Conditions on the lake were very pleasant. The water was just deep enough to move around.

‘There was no wind and visibility was amazing, being surrounded by the desert mountain ranges – the Black Mountains to the east, Panamint Mountains to the west, and Funeral Mountains to the northeast.’ 

The avid hiker told MailOnline Travel: 'Conditions on the lake were very pleasant. The water was just deep enough to move around'

The avid hiker told MailOnline Travel: ‘Conditions on the lake were very pleasant. The water was just deep enough to move around’

From the side of the road, the terrain looks completely dry with nothing around until you reach the mountains in the distance

From the side of the road, the terrain looks completely dry with nothing around until you reach the mountains in the distance

When the water dries up, all that's left is piles of salt and pebbles (pictured). The unusual sight of kayaks has baffled other tourists

When the water dries up, all that’s left is piles of salt and pebbles (pictured). The unusual sight of kayaks has baffled other tourists

Hall recalled of his trip: 'There was no wind and visibility was amazing, being surrounded by the desert mountain ranges - the Black Mountains to the east, Panamint Mountains to the west, and Funeral Mountains to the northeast'

Hall recalled of his trip: ‘There was no wind and visibility was amazing, being surrounded by the desert mountain ranges – the Black Mountains to the east, Panamint Mountains to the west, and Funeral Mountains to the northeast’







Courtesy: Daily Mail Online

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